Environment News

Tuesday, March 11, 2014 - 09:35

Community levels of air pollution significantly reduce physical activity levels in Americans according to a new study published in PLOS One. The association of air pollution with physical inactivity was particularly strong in normal weight individuals as opposed to obese people. The study, carried out by researchers in the Uniformed Services University and The Unites States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, correlated levels of airborne pollutants including particulate matter and ozone with leisure-time physical inactivity in adult Americans.

 

Tuesday, March 4, 2014 - 12:53

Increasing energy efficiency in buildings requires substantial coordination between design engineers and architects. Researchers at Princeton University applied a common structural form-finding technique to predict the equilibrium shapes and elastic energies of dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES).

Monday, February 24, 2014 - 14:55

In a surprising new finding, researchers have discovered that bacterial movement is impeded in flowing water, enhancing the likelihood that the microbes will attach to surfaces. The new work could have implications for the study of marine ecosystems, and for our understanding of how infections take hold in medical devices.

 

Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 12:00

The widespread loss of forest to sugarcane fields on the island of Mauritius has forced kestrels living there to survive by speeding up their life histories, according to a report published online on February 20 in the Cell Press journal Current Biology. By getting an earlier start, the birds are managing to have just as many offspring, even though they die sooner.

 

Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 07:33

In a new study, researchers from Imperial College Business School carried out a comprehensive nationwide analysis of the UK fleet of wind turbines, using local wind speed data from NASA. They showed that the turbines will last their full life of about 25 years before they need to be upgraded.

Monday, January 27, 2014 - 23:43

A new catalytic converter that could cut fuel consumption and manufacturing costs has been designed by a scientist from Imperial College London. A catalytic converter is the component in a vehicle’s exhaust system that eliminates harmful emissions. Tests suggest that the new prototype could reduce fuel consumption in a standard vehicle by up to three per cent. It could also deliver environmental benefits by reducing the amount of CO₂ that each vehicle emits.