Health News

Monday, June 23, 2014 - 20:22

Many women struggling to become pregnant may suffer from some degree of tubal blockage. Traditionally, an x-ray hysterosalpingogram (HSG) that uses dye is the most common procedure to determine whether a blockage exists, but it can cause extreme discomfort to the patient. UC San Diego Health System’s doctors are the first fertility specialists in the county to use a new ultrasound technique to assess fallopian tubes by employing a mixture of saline and air bubbles that is less painful, avoids x-ray exposure and is more convenient to patients during an already vulnerable time.

Monday, June 23, 2014 - 20:10

increase levels of the hormone cortisol, the disease and the growths initially can go undetected. Many of the symptoms are shared with other health issues, so the disease itself can be mistaken for obesity or depression in its early stages.

Monday, June 23, 2014 - 19:51

 Researchers believe they have learned how mutations in the gene that causes Huntington’s disease kill brain cells, a finding that could open new opportunities for treating the fatal disorder. Scientists first linked the gene to the inherited disease more than 20 years ago. 

Monday, June 23, 2014 - 19:40

Maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants in pregnancy can increase the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in offspring. This is the main message from research presented on June 22nd 2014 at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and The Endocrine Society in Chicago. The study was carried out using treatment of a rat model with the SSRI fluoxetine (Prozac®) by researchers in McMaster University in Canada.

Friday, June 20, 2014 - 12:08

 Cancers driven by – and dependent on – the potent mutated cancer gene KRAS have an especially poor prognosis, and three decades of scientific attempts have failed to produce drugs that can attack KRAS and halt the tumors’ runaway growth.

Monday, June 16, 2014 - 21:04

 The DNA in a pluripotent stem cell is bombarded with waves of proteins whose ebb and flow nudge the cell toward becoming blood, bone, skin or organs. A new theory by scientists at Rice University shows the cell’s journey is neither a simple step-by-step process nor all random.