Anthropology

06/15/2014 - 19:44

When it hasn't been your day – your week, your month, or even your year – it might be time to turn to Facebook friends for a little positive reinforcement. According to a new study by social scientists at Cornell University, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and Facebook, emotions can spread among users of online social networks.

06/11/2014 - 21:35

On the island of Java, in Indonesia, the silvery gibbon, an endangered primate, lives in the rainforests. In a behavior that’s unusual for a primate, the silvery gibbon sings: It can vocalize long, complicated songs, using 14 different note types, that signal territory and send messages to potential mates and family.

06/10/2014 - 19:35

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified the evolutionary origins of human herpes simplex virus (HSV) -1 and -2, reporting that the former infected hominids before their evolutionary split from chimpanzees 6 million years ago while the latter jumped from ancient chimpanzees to ancestors of modern humans – Homo erectus – approximately 1.6 million years ago.

06/09/2014 - 12:22

Father’s Day is coming up on 15th June and a recent study in the Journal of Research in Adolescence suggests a way in which better relationships can be fostered between adolescents and their fathers or stepfathers. The study was carried out by a team of researchers from San Francisco State University, the University of California and Arizona State University. The results suggest that if the adolescent talks to someone when involved in an argument with their father/stepfather and receives either a reason for their father’s behaviour or an explanation about who’s to blame, they feel better about both themselves and their father. Furthermore, the adolescent is less likely to suffer from depression.

06/05/2014 - 01:10

When people work in socially homogeneous groups, they overestimate their own contributions to the group’s success, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT scholar. In fact, in some cases such “self-serving bias” occurs to a degree about five times as great in homogeneous groups as in ethnically diverse groups.

05/07/2014 - 16:00

The Black Death was a devastating medieval epidemic, killing an estimated 30-50% of the European population between the years 1347-1351. Given the extremely high mortality associated with the Black Death, it might be assumed that the disease was indiscriminate in its targeting of individuals. However, a new study on skeletal remains from London cemeteries in the periods before and after the Black Death suggests otherwise.