Anthropology

04/11/2014 - 08:59

While too much attention to images of actresses and models in the media may contribute to women developing poor body image, a recent study suggests that this may extend to women who spend a lot of time on Facebook making comparisons between themselves and their friends. The research is being carried out by Petya Eckler of the University of Strathclyde, Yusuf Kalyango Jr. of Ohio University and Ellen Paasch of the University of Iowa. The team will present their findings at the 64th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in Seattle, WA (22nd-26th May 2014).

 

03/27/2014 - 16:00

A study on genetics of cattle breeds has shed new light on the genetic history of domesticated cattle which in turn can teach us about human history. Previously geneticists thought that almost 10,000 years ago, Africans domesticated cattle that were native to Africa. However, the results of the new study from the University of Missouri has revealed that in fact these ancient cattle had their origins in an area known as ‘The Fertile Crescent’ in the Middle East. This suggests that these ancient African farmers migrated south to Africa, bringing cattle with them. The study is published in PLoS Genetics on 27th March.

 

03/13/2014 - 08:57

Children of Vietnamese and Chinese immigrants to the USA attain levels of educational achievement that exceed those of both third generation black and white counterparts. This is despite that fact that the Vietnamese parents in particular lack high levels of formal education or marketable skills and hence socioeconomic advantages and non-economic middle class resources such as parental education. These are factors often associated with offspring’s educational achievement and economic success in adulthood.

 

03/05/2014 - 10:54

The medical history of Europe has been punctuated by epidemics including plague, smallpox and influenza. This has driven evolution of elements of the immune system from Europeans and Rroma (Gypsies) - populations of different genetic ancestry but living in the same areas- to converge. Plague is a major factor that has shaped these converged immune system elements of both modern Europeans and Rroma. These are the findings of a paper in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from a team of researchers from Spain, Romania, the Netherlands and India.

 

02/10/2014 - 12:56

John Mayer, the University of New Hampshire psychologist and internationally recognized researcher who co-developed the groundbreaking theory of emotional intelligence, now introduces another paradigm-shifting idea: in order to become our best selves, we use an even broader intelligence—personal intelligence—to understand our own personality and the personalities of the people around us.

 

01/28/2014 - 11:00

New research suggests a surprising degree of similarity in the organization of regions of the brain that control language and complex thought processes in humans and monkeys. The study, publishing online January 28 in the Cell Press journal Neuron, also revealed some key differences. The findings may provide valuable insights into the evolutionary processes that established our ties to other primates but also made us distinctly human.