Fisheries

09/19/2013 - 10:33

Scientists have successfully analysed the genetic make-up of the offspring of pregnant coelacanth females for the first time. They found that the likelihood that the offspring is fathered by one single individual is very high – unlike with many other fish species. Dr Kathrin Lampert from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Prof Dr Manfred Schartl from the University of Würzburg, together with their colleagues, report about their findings in the journal “Nature Communications”.

 

07/08/2013 - 12:06

A 10-year study of Chesapeake Bay fishes by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science provides the first quantitative evidence on a bay-wide scale that low-oxygen “dead zones” are impacting the distribution and abundance of “demersal” fishes—those that live and feed near the Bay bottom.

 

06/12/2013 - 12:46

Performing experiments in a river in Trinidad, a team of evolutionary biologists has found that male guppies continue to reproduce for at least ten months after they die, living on as stored sperm in females, who have much longer lifespans (two years) than males (three-four months).

 

01/18/2013 - 18:36

Invasive species are known for disturbing their new homes. Whether it's the zebra mussels in the Great Lakes or garlic mustard in native woodlands, their rampant multiplication crowds out native species.  But according to research just published in the journal Diversity and Distributions, that's not yet happening as a fish called the round goby advances up dozens of streams along Wisconsin's watery eastern border.

01/03/2013 - 19:14

By examining a set of fossil corals that are as much as 7,000 years old, scientists have dramatically expanded the amount of information available on the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, a Pacific Ocean climate cycle that affects climate worldwide. The new information will help assess the accuracy of climate model projections for 21st century climate change in the tropical Pacific.

11/15/2012 - 08:03

Researchers from Jena and Greifswald used GPS satellites for a long-term behavioural monitoring of land crab migration on Christmas Island. In cooperation with colleagues from the Zoological Institute at the University of Greifswald, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, used a GPS-based telemetric system to analyze movements of freely roaming robber crabs, which is the first large-scale study of any arthropod using GPS technology to monitor behaviour.