Genetics

04/10/2014 - 10:39

A new study shows that South American oilbird is the most genetically distinct bird and has not shared its genes with any other bird on the planet, in the last 80 million years. The cuckoo roller of Madagascar also remained evolutionarily distinct for a long time, more than 65 million years.

 

04/09/2014 - 11:16

In a new study led by Soojin Yi at Georgia Institute of Technology points the role of DNA methylation in regulating duplicate genes. DNA methylation is addition of a methyl group to the DNA nucleotide cytosine or adenine and some of this is heritable. This study found that small methyl group attaches to the duplicate genes and prevent that gene from being active providing explanation to why duplicate genes are lost eventually.

 

04/08/2014 - 10:30

Data about DNA differences, gene expression, or methylation can each tell epidemiologists something about the link between genomics and disease. A new statistical model that can integrate all those sources provides a markedly improved analysis, according to two new papers.

04/01/2014 - 09:16

New research in The FASEB Journal suggests that molecular function of the "hairless" gene may explain why mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of atrichia with papular lesions, a rare form of hair loss

 

03/28/2014 - 11:32

In the large-scale international FANTOM5 project, researchers from around the world have created an atlas that shows which different genes that are used in virtually all cell types that humans are composed of. Five research groups from three different departments at Karolinska Institutet  have participated in the work, which was presented today with coordinated publications in several scientific journals, including Nature and Blood.

 

03/28/2014 - 11:11

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers are developing a new predictive tool that could help patients with breast cancer and certain lung cancers decide whether follow-up treatments are likely to help. Dr. Jerry Shay, Vice Chairman and Professor of Cell Biology at UT Southwestern, led a three-year study on the effects of irradiation in a lung cancer-susceptible mouse model. When his team looked at gene expression changes in the mice, then applied them to humans with early stage cancer, the results revealed a breakdown of which patients have a high or low chance of survival.