Health

04/22/2014 - 16:33

Potentially valuable drugs slowed down by sticky molecules may get another shot at success. Joint research by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Genentech, the University of Delaware and Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) has revealed the reason why a certain class of proteins tends to form clusters that lead to high viscosity in drug solutions.

04/22/2014 - 16:17

Despite decades of common use for surgeries of all kinds, the precise mechanism through which general anesthesia works on the body remains a mystery. This may come as a surprise to the millions of Americans who receive inhaled general anesthesia each year. New research led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania investigated the common anesthetic sevoflurane and found that it binds at multiple key cell membrane protein locations that may contribute to the induction of the anesthetic response.

 

04/22/2014 - 14:45

Using reprogrammed skin cells, researchers have for the first time used stem cell techniques to grow fully functional assemblies of the cells that line airways leading to the lungs. The lab-grown airway tissue can now be used to study the molecular basis for lung diseases—from rare genetic disorders to common afflictions like asthma and emphysema—and test new drugs to treat the diseases.

 

04/22/2014 - 13:35

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression. A team of physician-scientists at UT Southwestern has identified a major mechanism by which ghrelin (a hormone with natural anti-depressant properties) works inside the brain. Simultaneously, the researchers identified a potentially powerful new treatment for depression in the form of a neuroprotective drug known as P7C3.

 

04/22/2014 - 13:28

Using a new approach to more accurately determine time of death in stillbirths, researchers from different institutions in the United States have found that both restricted and excessive foetal growth are associated with risk of stillbirth. Their findings are published on 22 April 2014 in the journal PLoS Medicine.

 

04/22/2014 - 09:13

When humans are suffering from an infection, it is common to become fatigued and to want to sleep more than usual. Two studies on fruit flies published online ahead of print in the journal Sleep suggest that this instinct should be followed. The studies from researchers in the University of Pennsylvania show that sleep is important in increasing resistance to infection and promoting survival.