Immunology

04/15/2014 - 14:43

It’s long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development – by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.
illustration of cancer-causing genes being amplified.

 

04/14/2014 - 10:07

The immune response is delicately balanced to ensure that non-self ‘invaders’ are expelled while self-elements are tolerated. Multiple processes and mediators cooperate to maintain this balance, including the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. A new study published in the journal Cell Death and Disease suggests that key inhibitors of apoptosis are central to maintaining this delicate balance.

 

04/10/2014 - 15:00

A major problem in eradicating HIV using combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) lies with the latent HIV pool that ‘hides’ in CD4 T cells, ready to replicate as soon as cART is interrupted. A new study led by researchers in  Gilead Sciences, Foster City, USA shows that the potent histone deacetylase inhibitor Romidepsin is effective in a ‘kick and kill’ approach to HIV.  This involves reactivating latent HIV to make it susceptible to cART. The study is published in PLoS Pathogens on April 10th 2014.

 

04/10/2014 - 10:52

The H5N1 bird flu virus has infected and killed hundreds of people, despite the fact that, at the moment, the virus can't spread easily between people. The death toll could become much worse if the virus became airborne. A study published by Cell Press April 10th in the journal Cell has revealed a minimal set of mutations allowing H5N1 to be transmitted through the air from one ferret to another. The findings will be invaluable for future surveillance programs and may provide early warning signals of the emergence of potential pandemic strains.

 

04/09/2014 - 21:02

According to a new study size of foot ulcer in type 2 diabetes patients was significantly reduced following treatment with resveratrol.

 

04/09/2014 - 06:45

Binge drinking often results in delayed wound healing and in exacerbation of wound infections. A new study from researchers in Loyola University, Chicago shows that mimicking binge alcohol exposure in a mouse model results in impairment of innate immune responses related to wound healing. The study is published online ahead of print in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.