Infectious Diseases

04/15/2014 - 14:43

It’s long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development – by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.
illustration of cancer-causing genes being amplified.

 

04/10/2014 - 15:00

A major problem in eradicating HIV using combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) lies with the latent HIV pool that ‘hides’ in CD4 T cells, ready to replicate as soon as cART is interrupted. A new study led by researchers in  Gilead Sciences, Foster City, USA shows that the potent histone deacetylase inhibitor Romidepsin is effective in a ‘kick and kill’ approach to HIV.  This involves reactivating latent HIV to make it susceptible to cART. The study is published in PLoS Pathogens on April 10th 2014.

 

04/10/2014 - 10:52

The H5N1 bird flu virus has infected and killed hundreds of people, despite the fact that, at the moment, the virus can't spread easily between people. The death toll could become much worse if the virus became airborne. A study published by Cell Press April 10th in the journal Cell has revealed a minimal set of mutations allowing H5N1 to be transmitted through the air from one ferret to another. The findings will be invaluable for future surveillance programs and may provide early warning signals of the emergence of potential pandemic strains.

 

04/09/2014 - 21:02

According to a new study size of foot ulcer in type 2 diabetes patients was significantly reduced following treatment with resveratrol.

 

04/07/2014 - 20:27

The deadly epidemic caused by H1N1 flu virus affects humans globally. Yearly up to half a million deaths are reported around the world due to this viral infection. A new study reported by scientists in McGill University brings hope for a possible drug that has potential to treat influenza.

 

04/03/2014 - 12:28

New research suggests that drugs commonly used to prevent organ rejection after transplantation may also be helpful for combating HIV. The findings, which are published in the American Journal of Transplantation, suggest a new strategy in the fight against HIV and AIDS.