Insects

04/17/2014 - 18:04

A sea slug discards its penis after copulation, the fish, Phallostethus cuulong, has its penis sprouting from its head. However in some insects from Brazilian caves, females are equiped with the penis and vagina in the males,  according to a new study.

 

11/27/2013 - 14:45

Using advanced methodologies that pit drug compounds against specific types of malaria parasite cells, an international team of scientists, including researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, have identified a potential new weapon and approach for attacking the parasites that cause malaria.

 

06/30/2013 - 08:11

A team led by UC San Francisco researchers has discovered a sensory system in the foreleg of the fruit fly that tells male flies whether a potential mate is from a different species. The work addresses a central problem in evolution that's poorly understood: how animals of one species know not to mate with animals of other species.

 

05/31/2013 - 09:41

An Ohio State University researcher and his collaborators have discovered a chemical that causes “kidney” failure in mosquitoes, which may pave the way to the development of new insecticides to fight deadly mosquito-transmitted diseases such as malaria and dengue fever.

 

03/29/2013 - 10:30

New research from North Carolina State University finds that higher temperatures found in urban environments are a key contributor to higher populations of insect pests called scale insects – indicating that an increase in temperatures associated with global climate change could lead to a significant increase in scale insect populations.

 

03/12/2013 - 09:22

Scientists have delved deeper into the evolutionary history of the fruit fly than ever before to reveal the genetic activity that led to the development of wings – a key to the insect’s ability to survive. The wings themselves are common research models for this and other species’ appendages. But until now, scientists did not know how the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, first sprouted tiny buds that became flat wings.