Microbiology

03/25/2014 - 08:26

The harvesting of microalgae in commercial applications has been intensely studied across various science and engineering disciplines, as these bio-friendly organisms offer a range of improvements for and have significant potential in the production of food supplements, environmental remediation, biofuel production, animal feed production and wastewater treatment. The Laboratory at the Chinese Academy of Sciences led an experimental investigation to improve the conventional microalgae harvesting technique. The improvement was chosen in order to increase the harvesting efficiency of the microalgae.

 

03/25/2014 - 08:10

Like other areas of the body previously thought of as sterile, the female breast harbours a unique microbiome or population of bacteria. Both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria are present and there are preliminary indications that that the levels of E. coli may be higher in cancerous breasts. These are the main findings of a new study published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology from researchers in Canada and Ireland.

 

03/20/2014 - 18:53

Incidence of multidrug resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections is increasing in children both in healthcare settings and in the community. Children with neurologic conditions are at increased risk. These are the findings of two studies from researchers in the USA and India published in advance online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

 

03/13/2014 - 11:07

Some commonly used drugs that combat aches and pains, fever, and inflammation are also thought to have the ability to kill bacteria. New research appearing online on March 13 in the Cell Press journal Chemistry & Biology reveals that these drugs, better known as NSAIDs, act on bacteria in a way that is fundamentally different from current antibiotics. The discovery could open up new strategies for fighting drug-resistant infections and ”superbugs.”

 

03/04/2014 - 12:10

Using technologies and computational modeling that trace the destiny of single cells, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine describe for the first time the earliest stages of fate determination among white blood cells called T lymphocytes, providing new insights that may help drug developers create more effective, longer-lasting vaccines against microbial pathogens or cancer.

 

02/24/2014 - 14:55

In a surprising new finding, researchers have discovered that bacterial movement is impeded in flowing water, enhancing the likelihood that the microbes will attach to surfaces. The new work could have implications for the study of marine ecosystems, and for our understanding of how infections take hold in medical devices.