Pediatrics

07/28/2014 - 10:36

A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of  herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society found.  The reviewers, from Penn’s Center for Evidence-based Practice, identified 30 reported cases in New York, Canada and Israel.

 

07/10/2014 - 05:22

As daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet’s impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates.

 

07/07/2014 - 18:40

Preterm babies admitted to high volume neonatal units are less likely to die compared to those admitted to low volume units, according to researchers. A study, published in BMJ Open, has provided new estimates to assess how organisational factors in England impact clinical outcomes of infants born preterm.

 

04/10/2014 - 07:41

Children who have suffered a head injury, for example in a car crash, experience unexpected long-term problems with relationships and social interactions although they appear to be completely recovered. This is due to lasting effects on the right frontal pole area of the brain that could be addressed with therapy to improve working memory. These are the main findings of a study from researchers in Brigham Young University published on 10th April in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation.

 

03/24/2014 - 10:03

The amount of physical activity undertaken by mothers has a direct association with the levels of physical activity of their pre-school children. However, in the UK mothers are falling far short of the recommended levels of physical activity, which therefore has consequences for the levels of activity of their children. These are the findings of a new study published in the journal Pediatrics on March 24th from researchers in the University of Cambridge, University College London and the University of Southampton.

 

03/07/2014 - 10:01

A new study has found that lower gestational age in infants and higher infant weight gain are significantly associated with both pre-school wheezing and with diagnosis of asthma in childhood. Importantly, the study brings some clarity to a field in which there was inconsistency in reports on association of low birth weight and risk of asthma.