Physics

04/13/2014 - 13:22

The complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Biological samples bend light in unpredictable ways, returning difficult-to-interpret information to the microscope and distorting the resulting image. New imaging technology developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus rapidly corrects for these distortions and sharpens high-resolution images over large volumes of tissue.

 

04/13/2014 - 12:00

A new study using a photosensitive molecule, azobenzene and carbon nanotubes demonstrates the feasibility of developing solar thermal fuels with significantly increased energy storage capacity.

 

04/09/2014 - 06:37

An AFM probe is a cantilever, shaped like a tiny diving board with a small, atomic-scale point on the free end. To measure forces at the molecular scale in a liquid, the probe attaches its tip to a molecule such as a protein and pulls; the resulting deflection of the cantilever is measured. The forces are in the realm of piconewtons, or trillionths of a newton. One newton is roughly the weight of a small apple.

 

03/27/2014 - 14:36

Light waves can be defined by three fundamental characteristics: their color (or wavelength), polarization, and direction. While it has long been possible to selectively filter light according to its color or polarization, selectivity based on the direction of propagation has remained elusive.

 

03/04/2014 - 12:53

Increasing energy efficiency in buildings requires substantial coordination between design engineers and architects. Researchers at Princeton University applied a common structural form-finding technique to predict the equilibrium shapes and elastic energies of dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES).

02/12/2014 - 09:50

Researchers at MIT and the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris provide the first detailed model for the 3-D shape of a strand of curly hair. This work could have applications in the computer animation film industry, but it also could be used by engineers to predict the curve that long steel pipes, tubing, and cable develop after being coiled around a spool for transport.