Veterinary Science

03/19/2014 - 08:37

A region of the canine brain which is associated with positive expectations such as social rewards responds more strongly to the smell of a human with whom they were familiar than to the smell of humans they didn’t know or to either familiar or unfamiliar dogs. The results were obtained in a study led by researchers in Emory University and Comprehensive Pet Therapy in the USA and published in the journal Behavioural Processes.

 

02/24/2014 - 20:30

Anyone who has ever spent time around goats knows they have a certain smell. By carefully analyzing eau de male goat, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on February 27 have now identified a novel, citrus-scented ingredient that speaks directly to the females. It acts on female goats' brains to turn their reproductive systems on.

 

10/23/2013 - 12:03

A study out this week in the journal Anesthesiology by University of Pennsylvania veterinarians Dorothy Cimino Brown and Kimberly Agnello has identified a new way of accomplishing this goal. Their trial, conducted in 70 pet dogs with bone cancer, demonstrated that a single spinal injection of a neurotoxin provided more relief from pain than the pain-relieving drugs that are typically used. Brown is professor and chair of the Department of Clinical Studies in Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine and director of the Veterinary Clinical Investigations Center. Agnello is an assistant professor of small animal surgery at Penn Vet.

 

10/11/2013 - 10:06

 Badgers are ultimately responsible for roughly half of tuberculosis (TB) in cattle in areas with high TB prevalence, according to new estimates.

 

09/10/2013 - 08:18

The introduction of young dairy goats into an existing herd is stressful for all animals involved. Rank fights and aggressive behaviour can further result in injury. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine (Vetmeduni Vienna) have found conditions under which young goats can acclimatize into new herds in a relatively low-stress manner. It seems that introduction of young goats into herds works best if kids are present. The results of the study are published in the current issue of the Journal of Dairy Science.

 

09/06/2013 - 08:58

Mammals contain cells whose primary function is to kill other cells in the body. The so-called Natural Killer (NK) cells are highly important in defending our bodies against viruses or even cancer. Scientists at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) provide evidence that NK cell activity can be influenced by phosphorylating a protein (STAT1) in NK cells. The results, which could be of immediate therapeutic relevance, are published in the journal Cell Reports.