E.coli

03/25/2014 - 08:10

Like other areas of the body previously thought of as sterile, the female breast harbours a unique microbiome or population of bacteria. Both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria are present and there are preliminary indications that that the levels of E. coli may be higher in cancerous breasts. These are the main findings of a new study published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology from researchers in Canada and Ireland.

 

07/20/2012 - 11:21

New research has shown that a protein does something that scientists once thought impossible: It unfolds itself and refolds into a completely new shape. This protein, called RfaH, activates genes that allow bacterial cells to launch a successful attack on their host, causing disease. The researchers determined that RfaH starts out in its alpha form, composed of two spiral shapes. Later, in its beta form, it resembles spokes on a wheel and is called a barrel.

07/02/2012 - 17:02

Finding biocompatible carriers that can get drugs to their targets in the body involves significant challenges.  Beyond practical concerns of manufacturing and loading these vehicles, the carriers must work effectively with the drug and be safe to consume. Vesicles, hollow capsules shaped like double-walled bubbles, are ideal candidates, as the body naturally produces similar structures to move chemicals from one place to another. Finding the right molecules to assemble into capsules, however, remains difficult.

02/22/2012 - 14:20

Researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have developed a new cell phone–based fluorescent imaging and sensing platform that can detect the presence of the bacterium Escherichia coli in food and water.

01/11/2012 - 09:31

Ever since the water supply in Walkerton, Ont., was contaminated by E. coli in 2000, Professor Philip Marsden has been trying to figure out just how a toxin released by that particular strain of the bacteria causes kidney damage in children.

12/01/2011 - 09:38

Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have engineered the first strains of  Escherichia coli bacteria that can digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars into all three of those transportation fuels. What’s more, the microbes are able to do this without any help from enzyme additives.