aging

06/24/2014 - 20:52

In the complex environment of a spinal cord injury, researchers have found that immune cells in the central nervous system of elderly mice fail to activate an important signaling pathway, dramatically lowering chances for repair after injury.

06/05/2014 - 12:26

While chemotherapy can save lives, it can also cause many side effects, including the depletion of immune cells. Also, even in the absence of chemotherapy, normal aging takes a heavy toll on the immune system, leading to immune deficiencies and a higher risk of developing leukemia and a variety of malignancies with age. Now researchers reporting in the June 5th issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Stem Cell have found that a simple dietary intervention—periodic fasting—may combat both chemotherapy-induced and aging-related changes in immune cell function by replenishing stem cells in the blood. The findings suggest that fasting may provide benefits for cancer patients, the elderly, and people with various immune defects.

 

04/25/2014 - 11:33

The evidence for what causes aging has typically been limited to the study of a single organism’s lifespan; our cells divide many times throughout our lives and eventually cause organs and our bodies to age and break down. But new research from the UNC School of Medicine suggests that how we age might depend on cellular interactions that we inherit from ancestors throughout many generations.

 

04/21/2014 - 11:54

Listening to religious music has a positive impact on the mental health of older people according to a new study published in the journal The Gerontologist. The study from a team of researchers in different US universities looked at measures of mental health including feelings of death anxiety and of life satisfaction, self-esteem, and a sense of control.

 

04/17/2014 - 16:57

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that older women, plucky individuals and those who have suffered a recent major loss are more likely to be compassionate toward strangers than other older adults.

 

04/01/2014 - 16:00

Approximately 50% of elderly humans experience sleep disorders, with consequences for quality of life and poor health. However, a new study on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster suggests that manipulation of the nutrient sensing insulin/IGF (IIS) and TOR (Target of Rapamycin) signalling networks eases age-related decline in sleep quality and duration. The study from researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Biology of Ageing in Cologne is published on April 1st in the journal PLoS Biology.