alzheimer's

02/03/2014 - 07:23

A daily dose of the antioxidant fisetin keeps mice—even those with genetic mutations linked to Alzheimer's—from experiencing memory and learning deficits as they age.

 

07/22/2013 - 16:55

Names forever linked to what they represent: diseases that ravage the brain’s neurons and leave entire regions to wither and die. These and other so-called neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with the buildup of toxic proteins that lead to neuronal death.

 

01/10/2013 - 14:05

Repression of a single protein in ordinary fibroblasts is sufficient to directly convert the cells – abundantly found in connective tissues – into functional neurons. The findings, which could have far-reaching implications for the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington’s, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, will be published online in advance of the January 17 issue of the journal Cell.

01/02/2013 - 14:42

New research in the FASEB Journal by NIH scientists suggests that a small molecule called TFP5 rescues plaques and tangles by blocking an overactive brain signal, thereby restoring memory in mice with Alzheimer's.

07/29/2012 - 10:50

Researchers are studying how components of cell structure function in order to determine viable ways to use them for fighting such ailments as cancer, Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s diseases. The model of microtubule assembly that most people accept shows the individual subunits, dimers of the protein tubulin, just link to grow the cylinder. But another model indicates that tubulin dimmers first form an open sheet structure that later closes into the cylinder. Xing and his team concluded that their computational study of the models indicate that the second model should be seriously considered for further testing.
 

12/14/2011 - 23:24

A study by researchers in the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy has shown that an antioxidant can delay the onset of all the indicators of Alzheimer's disease, including cognitive decline. The researchers administered an antioxidant compound called MitoQ to mice genetically engineered to develop Alzheimer's. The results of their study were published in the Nov. 2 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.