autoimmunity

04/14/2014 - 10:07

The immune response is delicately balanced to ensure that non-self ‘invaders’ are expelled while self-elements are tolerated. Multiple processes and mediators cooperate to maintain this balance, including the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. A new study published in the journal Cell Death and Disease suggests that key inhibitors of apoptosis are central to maintaining this delicate balance.

 

03/06/2013 - 15:50

Researchers expands the understanding of how one type of immune cell – known as a T helper 17 or Th17 cell – develops, and how its growth influences the development of immune responses. By figuring out how these cells are “wired,” the researchers make a surprising connection between autoimmunity and salt consumption, highlighting the interplay of genetics and environmental factors in disease susceptibility. The results of their work appear in three companion papers in Nature this week.

 

05/01/2012 - 11:48

Finding of an amplification defense mechanism may help research on brain infections, tumors & autoimmune attacks – and settle a debate in immunology.  Like a police officer calling for backup while also keeping a strong hold on a suspected criminal, immune cells in the brain take a two-tier approach to fighting off a threat, new research from the University of Michigan Health System finds.

04/04/2012 - 08:43

Individuals who suffer from autoimmune diseases also display a tendency to develop atherosclerosis – the condition popularly known as hardening of the arteries. Clinical researchers at LMU, in collaboration with colleagues in Würzburg, have now discovered a mechanism which helps to explain the connection between the two types of disorder. The link is provided by a specific class of immune cells called plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs).

01/13/2012 - 12:11

More than 32 million people in the United States have autoantibodies, which are proteins made by the immune system that target the body's tissues and define a condition known as autoimmunity, a study shows. The first nationally representative sample looking at the prevalence of the most common type of autoantibody, known as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), found that the frequency of ANA is highest among women, older individuals, and African-Americans.

01/03/2012 - 14:28

An international team of researchers led by Chaim O. Jacob, associate professor of medicine and microbiology & immunology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, has identified a gene mutation involved in causing lupus, a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, joints and organs.