brain injury

04/10/2014 - 07:41

Children who have suffered a head injury, for example in a car crash, experience unexpected long-term problems with relationships and social interactions although they appear to be completely recovered. This is due to lasting effects on the right frontal pole area of the brain that could be addressed with therapy to improve working memory. These are the main findings of a study from researchers in Brigham Young University published on 10th April in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation.

 

12/19/2012 - 13:40

As youth hockey players careen toward the boards, it is almost instinctive for them to duck their heads. But that is exactly the wrong thing to do. Experts say that this fast, powerful and physical sport can be safer if players follow some simple advice. USA Hockey, the national governing body for the sport, worked with Mayo Clinic to release a video with animation demonstrating the dangers of players ducking their heads as they crash into the boards during play. A training program called "Heads Up, Don't Duck" teaches players to automatically choose the safest posture for impact.

11/08/2012 - 11:40

A 30-minute brain injury education program taught in the hospital may increase children’s use of bicycle helmets, Georgia Health Sciences University researchers report. The researchers provided bicycle helmet safety and brain injury prevention information to 120 patients age 5 to 18 at Georgia Health Sciences Children’s Medical Center and found that helmet usage increased by 72.5 percent within the first month following the program – from only 11 children reporting wearing a bicycle helmet on every ride to 98 always wearing helmets.

08/02/2012 - 14:15

Concussions and even lesser head impacts may speed up the brain's natural aging process by causing signaling pathways in the brain to break down more quickly than they would in someone who has never suffered a brain injury or concussion.

05/11/2012 - 11:33

Even mild head injuries can cause significant abnormalities in brain function that last for several days, which may explain the neurological symptoms experienced by some individuals who have experienced a head injury associated with sports, accidents or combat, according to a study by Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers.

05/09/2012 - 10:34

Disorders of consciousness such as coma or a vegetative state caused by severe brain injury are poorly understood and their diagnosis has relied mainly on patient responses and measures of brain activity. However, new functional and imaging-based diagnostic tests that measure communication and signaling between different brain regions may provide valuable information about the potential for consciousness in patients unable to communicate.