cancer therapy

03/25/2014 - 08:42

Plasma medicine is a new and rapidly developing area of medical technology. Specifically, understanding the interaction of so-called atmospheric pressure plasma jets with biological tissues could help to use them in medical practice. Under the supervision of Sylwia Ptasinska from the University of Notre Dame, in Indiana, USA, Xu Han and colleagues conducted a quantitative and qualitative study of the different types of DNA damage induced by atmospheric pressure plasma exposure, the paper is published in EPJ D as part of a special issue on nanoscale insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. This approach, they hope, could ultimately lead to devising alternative tools for cancer therapy as well as applications in hospital hygiene, dental care, skin diseases, antifungal care, chronic wounds and cosmetics treatments.

 

03/21/2014 - 09:35

Caution is urged in pursuing use of CDK4 inhibitors as a broad spectrum cancer therapy following a new study showing that CDK4 can promote some B cell lymphomas. The study, led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center is published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

 

08/28/2013 - 09:10

Stomach cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide, actually falls into three broad subtypes that respond differently to currently available therapies, according to researchers at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore.

 

08/08/2013 - 08:57

In a new study, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund have now discovered how the transport of KRAS to the cell membrane can be interfered with by a new type of inhibitor. The approach that Deltarasin takes as an inhibitor is not directed against KRAS itself as previous approaches have been, but instead against the KRAS transport protein PDEδ. These research results open up approaches to cancer therapy, especially for the most deadly of all cancers, cancer of the pancreas, which is often detected at such a late stage that therapies can no longer counter it.

04/22/2013 - 11:31

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found that alternative splicing – a process that allows a single gene to code for multiple proteins – appears to be a new potential target for anti-telomerase cancer therapy.

 

12/12/2012 - 10:10

Cell aging, or cellular senescence, has an important role in the natural physiological response to tumor development. Activated oncogenes are able to induce senescence, and recent findings have suggested that oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) could play a key role in future cancer therapy. Researchers have now identified a previously unknown mechanism in the regulation of OIS. This study is published online in advance of the January issue of The American Journal of Pathology.