cell cycle

06/08/2012 - 15:41

Certain proteins, such as 14-3-3, conserve their basic functions of cell cycle control in diverse organisms, from worms to humans. In a study led by Julián Cerón and Simó Schwartz Jr, researchers from the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the Research Institute of Vall d'Hebron (VHIR) respectively, have described germ line functions of par-5, which is one of the two 14-3-3 proteins existing in Caenorhabditis elegans, worms used as experimental model in genetic studies. The overexpression of the 14-3-3 proteins is related to the resistance of tumors to chemotherapy, which could have implications for clinical practice.

10/30/2011 - 17:40

An international team of researchers led by investigators in the U.S. and Germany has shed light on the inner workings of the endocycle, a common cell cycle that fuels growth in plants, animals and some human tissues and is responsible for generating up to half of the Earth’s biomass. This discovery, led by a geneticist at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and reported Oct. 30 in Nature, leads to a new understanding of how cells grow and how rates of cell growth might be increased or decreased, which has important implications in both agriculture and medicine.

10/22/2011 - 15:47

Researchers from the NYU Cancer Institute, an NCI-designated cancer center at NYU Langone Medical Center, have identified a cell cycle-regulated mechanism behind the transformation of normal cells into cancerous cells.  The study shows the significant role that protein networks can play in a cell leading to the development of cancer.  The study results,  published in the October 21 issue of the journal Molecular Cell,  suggest that inhibition of the CK1 enzyme may be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer cells formed as a result of a malfunction in the cell’s mTOR signaling pathway.

08/18/2011 - 11:32

Researchers have probed deep inside the cell's control mechanism using a novel approach to understand temporal aspects of the full cell cycle.