drug development

07/28/2014 - 10:14

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date. The findings, which are published online in Nature, point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia, and could lead to new approaches to treating the disorder, which has seen little innovation in drug development in more than 60 years.

 

03/17/2014 - 12:36

Small protein fragments, also called peptides, are promising as drugs because they can be designed for very specific functions inside living cells. Insulin and the HIV drug Fuzeon are some of the earliest successful examples, and peptide drugs are expected to become a $25 billion market by 2018.

 

11/12/2013 - 10:57

Researchers studying how cancer spreads into bone have made a surprising discovery that suggests several investigational anti-cancer therapies just entering the drug-development pipeline may not have the desired effect.

 

10/08/2013 - 10:07

Antibody-drug conjugates, as they’re called, are the basis of new therapies on the market that use the target-recognizing ability of antibodies to deliver drug payloads to specific cell types—for example, to deliver toxic chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells while sparing most healthy cells. The new technique allows drug developers to forge more stable conjugates than are possible with current methods.

 

03/04/2013 - 14:37

Scientists have discovered a new role for many of the changes that occur to antibodies as they mature to fight disease. The discovery could change the thinking about how the human immune system protects against foreign substances and might eventually lead to the development of better antibody-based drugs.

 

02/20/2013 - 10:09

A series of studies published today, led by some of the world’s most eminent cancer experts, including Professor Richard Sullivan at King’s College London, outline some of the biggest challenges to the improvement of cancer care for children and young people. Experts from 19 countries believe further progress is being threatened by increasingly strict research regulations and insufficient development of new drugs.