fruit fly

04/17/2014 - 10:24

Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation, caused by loss of function of the gene for a protein called fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). A new study in the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) indicates that the normal function of this protein is to bind directly to the ribosomes, which are the structures in the cell on which proteins are synthesised, and selectively inhibit translation of proteins. The study, published on 17th April in the Cell Press journal Molecular Cell, is from researchers in the University of California, the Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and the State University of New York at Albany.

 

06/30/2013 - 08:11

A team led by UC San Francisco researchers has discovered a sensory system in the foreleg of the fruit fly that tells male flies whether a potential mate is from a different species. The work addresses a central problem in evolution that's poorly understood: how animals of one species know not to mate with animals of other species.

 

03/12/2013 - 09:22

Scientists have delved deeper into the evolutionary history of the fruit fly than ever before to reveal the genetic activity that led to the development of wings – a key to the insect’s ability to survive. The wings themselves are common research models for this and other species’ appendages. But until now, scientists did not know how the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, first sprouted tiny buds that became flat wings.

 

02/22/2013 - 10:33

When fruit flies sense parasitic wasps in their environment, they lay their eggs in an alcohol-soaked environment, essentially forcing their larvae to consume booze as a drug to combat the deadly wasps.

 

02/06/2013 - 07:51

Plant and animal cells contain two genomes: one in the nucleus and one in the mitochondria. When mutations occur in each, they can become incompatible, leading to disease. To increase understanding of such illnesses, scientists at Brown University and Indiana University have traced one example in fruit flies down to the individual errant nucleotides and the mechanism by which the flies become sick.

10/08/2012 - 15:17

Rice University biochemist James McNew took a risk and changed his lab's model organism from yeast to fruit flies to study a key protein that's been linked to hereditary spastic paraplegia. The gamble paid off with a new grant from the National Institutes of Health.