human behavior

08/01/2014 - 09:06

When goalkeepers are pitted against multiple kickers in tense penalty shootouts, their attempts to dive for the ball show a predictable pattern that kickers would do well to exploit. After kickers repeatedly kick in one direction, goalkeepers become increasingly likely to dive in the opposite direction, according to an analysis of all 361 kicks from the 37 penalty shootouts that occurred in World Cup and UEFA Euro Cup matches over a 36-year period.

 

06/09/2014 - 12:22

Father’s Day is coming up on 15th June and a recent study in the Journal of Research in Adolescence suggests a way in which better relationships can be fostered between adolescents and their fathers or stepfathers. The study was carried out by a team of researchers from San Francisco State University, the University of California and Arizona State University. The results suggest that if the adolescent talks to someone when involved in an argument with their father/stepfather and receives either a reason for their father’s behaviour or an explanation about who’s to blame, they feel better about both themselves and their father. Furthermore, the adolescent is less likely to suffer from depression.

01/15/2014 - 12:18

It might be true that people have a harder time controlling themselves when they are tired at the end of the day, but that doesn't mean that self-control is a limited resource, say authors in the Cell Press publication Trends in Cognitive Sciences on January 15th. The trick to fighting that couch potato urge is for you (or your kids) to find pleasure in productive activities.

 

12/03/2013 - 14:41

A new brain connectivity study from Penn Medicine published today in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences found striking differences in the neural wiring of men and women that’s lending credence to some commonly-held beliefs about their behavior.

 

12/02/2013 - 13:45

Children who experience profound neglect have been found to be more prone to a behavior known as "indiscriminate friendliness," characterized by an inappropriate willingness to approach adults, including strangers.

 

11/21/2013 - 11:30

The ability to differentiate your own body from others is a fundamental skill, critical for humans' ability to interact with their environments and the people in them. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, on November 21 provide some of the first evidence that newborn babies enter the world with the essential mechanisms for this kind of body awareness already in place.