mortality

06/13/2014 - 00:24

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found that persons with lower blood levels of vitamin D were twice as likely to die prematurely as people with higher blood levels of vitamin D. The finding, published in the June 12 issue of American Journal of Public Health, was based on a systematic review of 32 previous studies that included analyses of vitamin D, blood levels and human mortality rates.  The specific variant of vitamin D assessed was 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the primary form found in blood.

05/07/2014 - 16:00

The Black Death was a devastating medieval epidemic, killing an estimated 30-50% of the European population between the years 1347-1351. Given the extremely high mortality associated with the Black Death, it might be assumed that the disease was indiscriminate in its targeting of individuals. However, a new study on skeletal remains from London cemeteries in the periods before and after the Black Death suggests otherwise.

 

04/08/2014 - 09:38

The impact of overweightness and obesity on mortality may have been substantially underestimated in studies that rely on measurement of body mass index (BMI) only at the time of the study. When lifetime highest BMI is used as the criterion, the mortality risk attributable to excess weight increases. These are the major findings of a study in the journal Population Health Metrics, which suggests that risk assessment using only current BMI could be confounded by factors such as recent weight loss due to illness. The study is from Andrew Stokes in the laboratory of Prof Samuel Preston of the University of Pennsylvania.

 

03/14/2014 - 09:39

Large waist circumference leads to lower life expectancy even among people with healthy body mass index (BMI) according to the results of a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The study from researchers in the USA, Australia, Sweden, Norway and Finland found a linear association between waist circumference and all-cause mortality.

 

01/17/2014 - 11:11

A recent study led by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) shows that "practice may make perfect" when it comes to caring for patients with severe sepsis. The study showed that patients admitted to academic medical centers that care for more patients with severe sepsis have significantly lower mortality rates than patients cared for at academic medical centers with lower volumes of sepsis patients. Additionally, the superior outcomes at high volume centers were achieved at similar costs compared to the lower volume medical centers.

 

11/12/2013 - 11:02

A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine gives new insight into the geographic variation in drug poisoning mortality, with both urban centers and rural areas showing a large increase in death rates. While previous studies have looked at drug poisoning related deaths in broad strokes, this is the first study to examine them on the county level across the entire U.S.