perception

03/03/2014 - 07:31

Odors have a way of connecting us with moments buried deep in our past.  Maybe it is a whiff of your grandmother’s perfume that transports you back decades.  With that single breath, you are suddenly in her living room, listening as the adults banter about politics. The experiences that we accumulate throughout life build expectations that are associated with different scents. These expectations are known to influence how the brain uses and stores sensory information.  But researchers have long wondered how the process works in reverse: how do our memories shape the way sensory information is collected?

 

12/16/2013 - 12:20

Many parents say when their second child is born that their first child suddenly appears to have grown overnight. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on December 16 have an explanation: until the birth of the new child, those parents were subject to a ”baby illusion,” routinely misperceiving their youngest child as smaller (and younger) than he or she really was.

 

11/14/2013 - 13:33

The brain processes visual input to the level of understanding its meaning even if we never consciously perceive that input, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

 

09/16/2013 - 08:56

In the past few years, as imaging tools and techniques have improved, scientists have been working tirelessly to build a detailed map of neural connections in the human brain—with the ultimate hope of understanding how the mind works.

 

09/06/2013 - 08:38

A study from Karolinska Institutet has shown that neurons in our brain 'mirror' the space near others, just as if this was the space near ourselves. The study, published in the scientific journal Current Biology, sheds new light on a question that has long preoccupied psychologists and neuroscientists regarding the way in which the brain represents other people and the events that happens to those people.

 

06/27/2013 - 11:29

A study from Karolinska Institutet shows, that our imagination may affect how we experience the world more than we perhaps think. What we imagine hearing or seeing 'in our head' can change our actual perception. The study, which is published in the scientific journal Current Biology, sheds new light on a classic question in psychology and neuroscience - about how our brains combine information from the different senses.