proteins

04/14/2014 - 10:42

Phencyclidine (PCP)-treatment of rodents is used as a pre-clinical model for human schizophrenia. Using such a rat model, researchers in the University of Southern Denmark, the Danish Technological Institute and NeuroSearch A/S have identified a group of 352 proteins whose phosphorylation levels rapidly change after PCP treatment. The results of the study, recently published in the Journal of Proteome Research should be relevant in the ongoing quest to find and target the molecular basis of schizophrenia.

 

03/07/2014 - 11:50

Colleagues in Europe and America have solved the mystery of how one of the most important chaperone proteins in our cells, Hsp90, selects its client proteins. Hsp90 plays a role in nearly all processes in our cells, as well as in the origin of diseases such as Alzheimer disease, cancer and cystic fibrosis. Insight into the binding process of Hsp90 will increase our understanding of the origin of these diseases, thereby opening new avenues to prevent or cure them. The results of the research were published in Cell.

 

02/14/2014 - 07:26

It is well-recognised that a regime of moderate physical exercise can have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular health, but a new study from the Proteomics Unit at the Centre for Genomic Regulation, in Barcelona, Spain sheds light on the molecular mechanisms which could underlie this benefit. The study, published in the Journal of Proteomic Research, was carried out in a laboratory rat model and showed that a moderate exercise programme altered the phosphorylation of a suite of proteins in the mitochondria of heart cells. Mitochondria are vitally important in allowing heart muscle to adapt to exercise-related metabolic demands.

 

02/07/2014 - 10:46

The lipid-rich membranes of cells are largely impermeable to proteins, but evolution has provided a way through – in the form of transmembrane tunnels. A new study shows in unmatched detail what happens as proteins pass through such a pore.

 

02/06/2014 - 15:07

An international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Indiana University, have identified a protein that broadly regulates how genetic information transcribed from DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA) is processed and ultimately translated into the myriad of proteins necessary for life.

 

01/15/2014 - 10:23

Highly diverse cancers share one trait: the capacity for endless cell division. Unregulated growth is due in large part to the fact that tumor cells can rebuild protective ends of their chromosomes, which are made of repeated DNA sequences and proteins. Normally, cell division halts once these structures, called telomeres, wear down. But cancer cells keep on going by deploying one of two strategies to reconstruct telomeres.