Latest Science and Society News

What are children being taught in math classes today? According to a new paper by USC Rossier School of Education assistant professor Morgan Polikoff, the answer is a whole lot of what they were taught last year.

Arguably the worst feature of societies with class structures – the disproportionate suffering of the poor – may have been the driving force behind the spread of those stratified societies across the globe at the expense of more egalitarian societies. During hard times, a society in which the bulk of the suffering is borne by the poor can survive and expand into new territory more readily than can egalitarian societies.

In the September issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, a team of distinguished  psychological scientists argue for a new framework for identifying and supporting giftedness in all domains in the United States.

New research from Carnegie Mellon University's George Loewenstein and Duke University's Sunita Sah demonstrates that advisers confronting a conflict of interest give more biased advice when there are multiple advice recipients as opposed to just one recipient, and in the case of just one recipient the advice is more biased when the adviser does not know the name of the recipient.

An associate professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware, Galloway has long focused the research in his lab on improving the odds for kids whose mental, social and emotional development is delayed because of their physical inability to explore their environment. With collaborator Sunil Agrawal, a mechanical engineering professor at UD, Galloway has created robotic devices that enable children as young as six months to “drive,” providing them with an unprecedented ability to navigate on their own.

 

An associate professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware, Galloway has long focused the research in his lab on improving the odds for kids whose mental, social and emotional development is delayed because of their physical inability to explore their environment. With collaborator Sunil Agrawal, a mechanical engineering professor at UD, Galloway has created robotic devices that enable children as young as six months to “drive,” providing them with an unprecedented ability to navigate on their own.