Space Science News

Friday, May 3, 2013 - 08:38

The discovery by Tim Kennelly, a University of Iowa junior majoring in physics and astronomy, is one of the first direct observations of seasonal changes in Saturn's magnetosphere. In addition, the finding carries over to all planets having a magnetosphere, including Earth.

 

Thursday, April 18, 2013 - 09:42

Using the telescope network ALMA, astronomers have been able to determine the positions of more than 100 of the most prolific galaxies with unprecedented accuracy. The exact positions could help to solve the mystery of the supposedly extremely high star formation rates: Accordingly the amount of radiation released is not from one but from several galaxies - each of which have more moderate star formation rate and in accordance with theoretical models.

 

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - 13:12

Our own Milky Way, astronomers believe, is a spiral. Our solar system and Earth reside somewhere near one of its filamentous, swept-back arms. And nearly 70 percent of the galaxies closest to the Milky Way are spirals, suggesting they have taken the most ordinary of galactic forms in a universe with billions of galaxies.

 

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - 12:36

 Large impacts on the Moon can form wide craters and turn surface rock liquid. Geophysicists once assumed that liquid rock would be homogenous when it cooled. Now researchers have found  evidence that pre-existing mineralogy can survive impact melt.

 

Friday, March 22, 2013 - 08:30

A group of astronomers led by Amelia Stutz of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg have discovered the youngest known protostar yet: stellar embryos deeply embedded in unexpectedly dense dust cocoons. The discovery promises new insights into the earliest stages of star formation, and consequently into the way our home star, the Sun, came into being. The scientists used both the Herschel Space Telescope and the submillimetre telescope APEX for their observations.

 

Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 13:49

A team of international scientists including a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory astrophysicist has made the most detailed examination yet of the atmosphere of a Jupiter-size like planet beyond our solar system.