tumor

08/25/2014 - 19:00

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas – the primary form of a deadly brain cancer – are resistant to drug therapy. The answer lies not in the DNA sequence of the tumor, but in its epigenetic signature. These findings have been published online as a priority report in the journal Oncotarget.

 

07/16/2014 - 09:16

Scientists have designed a new self-assembling nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier. The new nanoparticle, developed by researchers at Imperial College London, boosts the effectiveness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanning by specifically seeking out receptors that are found in cancerous cells. 

06/20/2014 - 12:08

 Cancers driven by – and dependent on – the potent mutated cancer gene KRAS have an especially poor prognosis, and three decades of scientific attempts have failed to produce drugs that can attack KRAS and halt the tumors’ runaway growth.

05/27/2014 - 10:01

A new drug targeting the protein PTP1B, which is up-regulated in HER2-positive breast cancer, has given positive results in reducing tumour growth and lung metastases in a mouse model of HER2-positive breast cancer. This is the major finding of a paper appearing online in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, from a multi-institution team led by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists.

 

05/15/2014 - 10:57

Researchers have shown for the first time in an animal that is more closely related to humans that it is possible to make new bone from stem-cell-like induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) made from an individual animal's own skin cells. The study in monkeys reported in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports on May 15th also shows that there is some risk that those iPSCs could seed tumors, but that unfortunate outcome appears to be less likely than studies in immune-compromised mice would suggest.

 

05/07/2014 - 06:41

Eczema caused by defects in the skin could reduce the risk of developing skin cancer, according to new research by King’s College London. The immune response triggered by eczema could help prevent tumour formation by shedding potentially cancerous cells from the skin.