hiv

04/10/2014 - 15:00

A major problem in eradicating HIV using combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) lies with the latent HIV pool that ‘hides’ in CD4 T cells, ready to replicate as soon as cART is interrupted. A new study led by researchers in  Gilead Sciences, Foster City, USA shows that the potent histone deacetylase inhibitor Romidepsin is effective in a ‘kick and kill’ approach to HIV.  This involves reactivating latent HIV to make it susceptible to cART. The study is published in PLoS Pathogens on April 10th 2014.

 

04/03/2014 - 12:28

New research suggests that drugs commonly used to prevent organ rejection after transplantation may also be helpful for combating HIV. The findings, which are published in the American Journal of Transplantation, suggest a new strategy in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

 

11/27/2013 - 11:46

A recently discovered HIV strain leads to significantly faster development of AIDS than currently prevalent forms, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden. The period from infection to development of AIDS was the shortest reported among HIV-1 types, at around five years.

 

10/31/2013 - 13:43

Collaborating scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and Weill Cornell Medical College have determined the first atomic-level structure of the tripartite HIV envelope protein—long considered one of the most difficult targets in structural biology and of great value for medical science.

 

10/24/2013 - 11:00

HIV infection is typically treated with antiretroviral therapy, which targets actively replicating HIV but does not affect inactive or latent forms of the virus. The latent reservoir is the biggest barrier to curing HIV, and a study published by Cell Press October 24th in the journal Cell has shown that it could be 60 times larger than previously thought.

 

09/20/2013 - 15:43

Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) discovered that an antibody that binds and neutralizes HIV likely also targets the body’s own “self” proteins. This finding could complicate the development of HIV vaccines designed to elicit this protective antibody, called 4E10, and others like it, as doing so might be dangerous or inefficient.