graphene

05/23/2014 - 09:12

Graphene’s promise as a material for new kinds of electronic devices, among other uses, has led researchers around the world to study the material in search of new applications. But one of the biggest limitations to wider use of the strong, lightweight, highly conductive material has been the hurdle of fabrication on an industrial scale.

 

04/30/2014 - 09:12

Researchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.

 

04/29/2014 - 15:12

Researchers Jun Lou at Rice and Ting Zhu at Georgia Tech have measured the fracture toughness of imperfect graphene for the first time and found it to be somewhat brittle. While it’s still very useful, graphene is really only as strong as its weakest link, which they determined to be “substantially lower” than the intrinsic strength of graphene. The researchers reported in the journal Nature Communications the results of tests in which they physically pulled graphene apart to see how much force it would take. Specifically, they wanted to see if graphene follows the century-old Griffith theory that quantifies the useful strength of brittle materials.

 

11/04/2013 - 09:55

Recent advances in graphene research provide various possibilities to enhance performance characteristics and current approaches to design new bio-devices. Especially, smart and flexible bioelectronics on graphene has emerged as a new frontier in this area. Graphene has started to be seen an ideal signal transducer and promising alternative for the production of low cost bioelectronics devices. However, control and regulation on biological systems are always desired for advance applications and productions. The integration of biomolecules with electronic elements to fabricate functional devices attracts considerable attention because of the basic fundamental scientific questions and the potential applications of the system.

 

10/25/2013 - 09:21

A team headed by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg have demonstrated that it also meets an important condition for use in novel lasers for terahertz pulses with long wavelengths. The direct emission of terahertz radiation would be useful in science, but no laser has yet been developed which can provide it. Theoretical studies have previously suggested that it could be possible with graphene. However, there were well-founded doubts - which the team in Hamburg has now dispelled. At the same time, the scientists discovered that the scope of application for graphene has its limitations though: in further measurements, they showed that the material cannot be used for efficient light harvesting in solar cells.

 

10/21/2013 - 10:36

By giving the carbon nanotubes an electrical charge, they were able to pull apart individual strands. Using this method, nanotubes can be sorted or refined, then deposited in a uniform layer onto the surface of any object.