genome

11/18/2013 - 13:10

By using a new analysis method, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) in Sweden have found close to one hundred novel human gene regions that code for proteins. A number of these regions are so-called pseudogenes, which may be linked to cancer. The expectation is now that this recently developed protein analysis method, published in the scientific journal Nature Methods, will open up a whole new field of research.

 

08/13/2013 - 08:25

Researchers have probed deep into the cell’s genome, beyond the basic genetic code, to begin learning the “grammar” that helps determine whether or not a gene gets switched on to make the protein it encodes.

 

07/23/2013 - 21:10

The new research, published online in Nature, builds upon the Feng Zhang lab’s work with transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), highly customizable factors that can be engineered to bind anywhere in the genome. TALEs offer an anchor point from which to tweak and modify the genome. In the latest experiments, the team has attached a protein that’s only active when light is present, giving them further control over not only where but when to turn on or off molecular machinery.

 

04/22/2013 - 10:05

An international team of researchers has decoded the genome of a creature whose evolutionary history is both enigmatic and illuminating: the African coelacanth. A sea-cave dwelling, five-foot long fish with limb-like fins, the coelacanth was once thought to be extinct. A living coelacanth was discovered off the African coast in 1938, and since then, questions about these ancient-looking fish – popularly known as “living fossils” – have loomed large. Coelacanths today closely resemble the fossilized skeletons of their more than 300-million-year-old ancestors. Its genome confirms what many researchers had long suspected: genes in coelacanths are evolving more slowly than in other organisms.

 

02/25/2013 - 11:58

Lampreys diverged from our own lineage about 500 million years ago, during the Cambrian period. The new research sheds light on how the species – long considered an invasive predator – adapted and thrived over the ages. Analyzing its genome will provide scientists with insights into the evolution of organisms as diverse as frogs, chickens and humans, all of which have backbones.

 

01/21/2013 - 17:17

Studies led by cell biologist Thomas Maresca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are revealing new details about a molecular surveillance system that helps detect and correct errors in cell division that can lead to cell death or human diseases.