memory

04/16/2014 - 11:38

Synapses are the points of contact at which information is transmitted between neurons. Without them, we would not be able to form thoughts or remember things. For memories to endure, synapses sometimes have to remain stable for very long periods. But how can a synapse last if its components have to be replaced regularly?

 

03/27/2014 - 09:03

The problems people with autism have with memory formation, higher-level thinking and social interactions may be partially attributable to the activity of receptors inside brain cells, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have learned.

 

03/10/2014 - 16:29

Even the mildest form of a traumatic brain injury, better known as a concussion, can deal permanent, irreparable damage. Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania is using mathematical modeling to better understand the mechanisms at play in this kind of injury, with an eye toward protecting the brain from its long-term consequences.

 

03/06/2014 - 09:22

Insomnia is associated with brain activity changes during wakefulness according to a new study. The results showed that the motor cortex of the brains of people with insomnia were surprisingly more neuroplastic- that is more adaptable to change and retraining- than those of good sleepers. This is despite association of insomnia with decreases in concentration and memory.

 

03/03/2014 - 07:31

Odors have a way of connecting us with moments buried deep in our past.  Maybe it is a whiff of your grandmother’s perfume that transports you back decades.  With that single breath, you are suddenly in her living room, listening as the adults banter about politics. The experiences that we accumulate throughout life build expectations that are associated with different scents. These expectations are known to influence how the brain uses and stores sensory information.  But researchers have long wondered how the process works in reverse: how do our memories shape the way sensory information is collected?

 

02/19/2014 - 09:58

Computer chips keep getting faster because transistors keep getting smaller. But the chips themselves are as big as ever, so data moving around the chip, and between chips and main memory, has to travel just as far. As transistors get faster, the cost of moving data becomes, proportionally, a more severe limitation.