global warming

07/10/2014 - 05:22

As daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet’s impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates.

 

06/17/2014 - 20:12

The Antarctic shore is a place of huge contrasts, as quiet, dark, and frozen winters give way to bright, clear waters, thick with algae and peppered with drifting icebergs in summer. But as the planet has warmed in the last two decades, massive losses of sea ice in winter have left icebergs free to roam for most of the year. As a result, say researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on June 16, boulders on the shallow seabed—once encrusted with a rich assemblage of species in intense competition for limited space—now mostly support a single species. The climate-linked increase in iceberg activity has left all other species so rare as to be almost irrelevant.

05/21/2014 - 06:26

The Greenland Ice Sheet experienced widespread surface melt in dry zone areas most recently in 1889 and 2012. A study conducted by scientists at Dartmouth College and the Desert Research Institute questioned the reason that dry snow didn’t melt in hotter years such as 2007 or 2010. Accordingly, the researchers hypothesized that the albedo of the snow combined with warm temperatures were responsible for the melting.

 

11/12/2013 - 11:11

On the continental margins, where the seafloor drops hundreds of meters below the water’s surface, low temperatures and high pressure lock methane inside ice crystals. Called methane hydrates, these crystals are a potential energy source, but they are also a potential source of global warming if massive amounts of methane were released during an earthquake or by rising ocean temperatures.

 

09/17/2013 - 11:13

A team of international climate scientists including University of Adelaide's Professor Tom Wigley has today reported further strong evidence of the human influence on climate change.

 

08/30/2013 - 13:06

The East Antarctic Ice Sheet seems to be more vulnerable to the effects of cli-mate change than previously thought. For the first time, an international re-search team from the Universities of Durham and Zurich has studied the long-term development of outlet glaciers using satellite images, revealing that the advance and retreat of the 175 glaciers studied are closely linked to climatic changes.