tumors

06/15/2014 - 20:00

Scientists from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have conducted a first-of-its-kind study that characterizes the cellular diversity within glioblastoma tumors from patients. The study, which looked at the expression of thousands of genes in individual cells from patient tumors, revealed that the cellular makeup of each tumor is more heterogeneous than previously suspected. The findings, which appear online in Science Express, will help guide future investigations into potential treatments for this devastating disease.

10/17/2013 - 09:06

A UC San Francisco-led team of scientists has discovered that a gene mutation found in some bladder cancers is indicative of low-risk tumors that are unlikely to recur or progress after surgery.

 

03/25/2013 - 10:37

Researchers in the lab of Carol Otey, PhD, found that the protein palladin enhances the ability of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to assemble organelles known as invadopodia to break down the barriers between cells and create pathways for tumors to spread throughout the body.

 

12/13/2012 - 12:12

It has been known for some time that exercise is important for cancer patients, but few studies have looked at the practicality of exercise programs and whether even a minimal workout can help. Exercise can reduce cancer-related fatigue, improve sleep, boost a sense of wellness, and reduce the recurrence of certain types of tumors. A Mayo Clinic study published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management found that a brief, at-home exercise program — dubbed the Rapid, Easy, Strength Training program, or REST, — was sufficient to increase cancer patients' mobility and reduce fatigue.

12/05/2012 - 13:26

A combination therapy using an experimental new drug shows significant promise for women with a common type of breast cancer in which estrogen causes their tumors to grow, researchers with the Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center report.

09/26/2012 - 12:59

Regular mammography screening can help narrow the breast cancer gap between black and white women, according to a retrospective study published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment in August. Earlier studies have shown that black women in Chicago are more than twice as likely to die of breast cancer compared to white women. Black women with breast cancer reach the disease’s late stages more often than white women, and their tumors are more likely to be larger and more biologically aggressive.