Technology News

Wednesday, November 6, 2013 - 11:30

How much in energy and cost savings would your state realize if it updated its commercial building energy codes? You can find out in a new on-line publication from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The state-by-state reports were the product of a new building energy efficiency analysis tool developed by NIST.

 

Tuesday, November 5, 2013 - 18:50

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have joined with an international team to engineer and measure a potentially important new class of nanostructured materials for microwave and advanced communication devices. Based on NIST's measurements, the new materials—a family of multilayered crystalline sandwiches—might enable a whole new class of compact, high-performance, high-efficiency components for devices such as cellular phones.

 

Tuesday, November 5, 2013 - 18:36

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a compact atomic clock design that relies on cold rubidium atoms instead of the usual hot atoms, a switch that promises improved precision and stability.

 

Monday, November 4, 2013 - 17:31

Physical activity tracking apps on smart phones are a potentially important tool for doctors who want to collect data and create treatment or intervention plans to improve the health of patients who struggle with activity and movement -- such as those with Parkinson’s disease.

 

Monday, November 4, 2013 - 09:55

Recent advances in graphene research provide various possibilities to enhance performance characteristics and current approaches to design new bio-devices. Especially, smart and flexible bioelectronics on graphene has emerged as a new frontier in this area. Graphene has started to be seen an ideal signal transducer and promising alternative for the production of low cost bioelectronics devices. However, control and regulation on biological systems are always desired for advance applications and productions. The integration of biomolecules with electronic elements to fabricate functional devices attracts considerable attention because of the basic fundamental scientific questions and the potential applications of the system.

 

Thursday, October 31, 2013 - 16:00

After suffering a traumatic brain injury, patients are often placed in a coma to give the brain time to heal and allow dangerous swelling to dissipate. These comas, which are induced with anesthesia drugs, can last for days. During that time, nurses must closely monitor patients to make sure their brains are at the right level of sedation — a process that MIT’s Emery Brown describes as “totally inefficient.”