Technology News

Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 09:42

DNA encodes the genetic material passed on from generation to generation. For the information encoded in the DNA to be made into the proteins and enzymes necessary for life, ribonucleic acid (RNA), single-stranded genetic material found in the ribosomes of cells, serves as intermediary. Although usually single-stranded, some RNA sequences have the ability to form a double helix, much like DNA.

 

Monday, October 28, 2013 - 13:14

In the early morning hours of Oct. 18, NASA’s Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) made history, transmitting data from lunar orbit to Earth at a rate of 622 Megabits-per-second (Mbps). That download rate is more than six times faster than previous state-of-the-art radio systems flown to the moon.

 

Friday, October 25, 2013 - 09:35

Researchers from North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Laser Zentrum Hannover have discovered that a naturally-occurring compound can be incorporated into three-dimensional (3-D) printing processes to create medical implants out of non-toxic polymers. The compound is riboflavin, which is better known as vitamin B2.

 

Friday, October 25, 2013 - 09:21

A team headed by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg have demonstrated that it also meets an important condition for use in novel lasers for terahertz pulses with long wavelengths. The direct emission of terahertz radiation would be useful in science, but no laser has yet been developed which can provide it. Theoretical studies have previously suggested that it could be possible with graphene. However, there were well-founded doubts - which the team in Hamburg has now dispelled. At the same time, the scientists discovered that the scope of application for graphene has its limitations though: in further measurements, they showed that the material cannot be used for efficient light harvesting in solar cells.

 

Tuesday, October 22, 2013 - 09:18

A new study set out to use numerical simulations to validate previous theoretical predictions describing materials exhibiting so-called antiferromagneting characteristics. A recently discovered theory shows that the ordering temperature depends on two factors—namely the spin-wave velocity and the staggered magnetisation. The results, largely consistent with these theoretical predictions, have now been published in a paper in EPJ B by Ming-Tso Kao and Fu-Jiun Jiang from the National Taiwan Normal University, in Taipei.

 

Monday, October 21, 2013 - 13:54

When it comes to designing extremely water-repellent surfaces, shape and size matter. That's the finding of a group of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, who investigated the effects of differently shaped, nanoscale textures on a material's ability to force water droplets to roll off without wetting its surface. These findings and the methods used to fabricate such materials—published online October 21, 2013, in Advanced Materials—are highly relevant for a broad range of applications where water-resistance is important, including power generation and transportation.