Technology News

Monday, October 17, 2011 - 07:11

A well-known method of making heat sinks for electronic devices is a process called sintering, in which powdered metal is formed into a desired shape and then heated in a vacuum to bind the particles together. But in a recent experiment, some students tried sintering copper particles in air and got a big surprise.
 

Friday, October 14, 2011 - 14:28

They’re the building block of graphite – ultra-thin sheets of carbon, just one atom thick, whose discovery was lauded in 2010 with a Nobel Prize in Physics. 
 

Friday, October 14, 2011 - 14:20

Scientists at the University of Göttingen and the Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen have developed a method allowing robots to learn fluid movements such as writing or reaching for objects. This would allow future machines to be able to imitate handwriting, pour water into a glass or handle a dishwasher. The results were published online in the journal IEEE Transactions on Robotics.

Friday, October 14, 2011 - 11:10
A research group led by ETH Zurich has now, for the first time, visualized the motion of electrons during a chemical reaction. The new findings in the experiment are of fundamental importance for photochemistry and could also assist the design of more efficient solar cells.

 

Friday, October 14, 2011 - 10:16

Fluctuations are fundamental to many physical phenomena in our everyday life, such as the phase transitions from a liquid into a gas or from a solid into a liquid. But even at absolute zero temperature, where all motion in the classical world is frozen out, special quantum mechanical fluctuations prevail that can drive the transition between two quantum phases. Now a team around Immanuel Bloch and Stefan Kuhr at Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ) has succeeded in directly observing such quantum fluctuations.

Friday, October 14, 2011 - 09:02

They look like 2-by-4s, but the materials being created in a Rice University lab are more suited to construction with light. Researcher Jason Hafner calls them "nanobelts," microscopic strips of gold that could become part of highly tunable sensors or nanomedical devices.