Technology News

Tuesday, April 29, 2014 - 15:12

Researchers Jun Lou at Rice and Ting Zhu at Georgia Tech have measured the fracture toughness of imperfect graphene for the first time and found it to be somewhat brittle. While it’s still very useful, graphene is really only as strong as its weakest link, which they determined to be “substantially lower” than the intrinsic strength of graphene. The researchers reported in the journal Nature Communications the results of tests in which they physically pulled graphene apart to see how much force it would take. Specifically, they wanted to see if graphene follows the century-old Griffith theory that quantifies the useful strength of brittle materials.

 

Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 04:53

Use of virtual ‘cyber-buddies’ may help people’s motivation and persistence during exercise according to a new study from researchers in Michigan State University in the USA and the University of Kent in the UK. The study is published in the Games for Health Journal.

 

Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 13:22

The complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Biological samples bend light in unpredictable ways, returning difficult-to-interpret information to the microscope and distorting the resulting image. New imaging technology developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus rapidly corrects for these distortions and sharpens high-resolution images over large volumes of tissue.

 

Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 12:00

A new study using a photosensitive molecule, azobenzene and carbon nanotubes demonstrates the feasibility of developing solar thermal fuels with significantly increased energy storage capacity.

 

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 06:37

An AFM probe is a cantilever, shaped like a tiny diving board with a small, atomic-scale point on the free end. To measure forces at the molecular scale in a liquid, the probe attaches its tip to a molecule such as a protein and pulls; the resulting deflection of the cantilever is measured. The forces are in the realm of piconewtons, or trillionths of a newton. One newton is roughly the weight of a small apple.

 

Monday, April 7, 2014 - 10:23

New research from North Carolina State University and UNC-Chapel Hill reveals that energy is transferred more efficiently inside of complex, three-dimensional organic solar cells when the donor molecules align face-on, rather than edge-on, relative to the acceptor. This finding may aid in the design and manufacture of more efficient and economically viable organic solar cell technology.