Technology News

Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 11:24

Simulation experts at the Ohio Supercomputer Center are developing a virtual environment in which health care professionals can safely learn about potential hazards they might encounter when providing in-home services.

 

Friday, January 10, 2014 - 12:54

A researcher at the University of Cincinnati is leveraging the compute and storage resources of the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) to simulate the behavior of elusive cosmic particles in an experiment that may provide answers to the most fundamental questions in our understanding of the evolution of the universe.

 

Thursday, January 9, 2014 - 11:35

In a paper published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Qi Zhang, an assistant professor of biochemistry and biophysics and member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and his team have revealed his newest weapon – a powerful technique to visualize the shape and motion of RNA at the atomic level using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR).

 

Wednesday, January 8, 2014 - 11:38

Rice University scientists have pioneered a tabletop magnetic pulse generator that does the work of a room-sized machine – and more. A palm-sized coil is the heart of RAMBO, a Rice-built tabletop system to expose experiments to high magnetic fields. The coil developed by Hiroyuki Nojiri at Tohoku University in Japan provides a pulsed field of up to 30 tesla and allows for the collection of data at close range.

 

Tuesday, January 7, 2014 - 11:44

Finding the most efficient way to transport items across a network like the U.S. highway system or the Internet is a problem that has taxed mathematicians and computer scientists for decades.

 

Thursday, January 2, 2014 - 07:55

Researchers have tried a variety of methods to develop detectors that are responsive to a broad range of infrared light — which could form imaging arrays for security systems, or solar cells that harness a broader range of sunlight’s energy — but these methods have all faced limitations. Now, a new system developed by researchers at five institutions, including MIT, could eliminate many of those limitations.